Sunday, May 23, 2010

World Turtle Day.

Western Pond Turtle

Celebrate World Turtle Day

"Turtles are one of the most endearing and symbolic of America's native wildlife. Turtles not only fascinate each passing generation of children, who find endless wonders under those hard shells, but they also continue to serve as a timeless role model in children's literature: the slow and steady turtle, whose patient progress always wins out against his fast but feckless competitor.

Yet the turtles' lofty status hasn't prevented humans from abusing the creature. In fact, all land, freshwater, and sea turtles are facing imminent threats to their survival, simply because of human activities. Turtles are the reptile most affected by the pet trade, not to mention the food and traditional medicine industries. Many turtle species also suffer from the effects of pollution as well as from the destructive effects of industrial fishing operations.

Despite these hardships, May is a busy month for turtles. Many have recently emerged from winter hibernation and are beginning their search for mates and nesting areas. For this reason, May 23 was designated World Turtle Day."
More at:

Sunday is World Turtle Day
World turtle day "According to Native American lore, the turtle symbolizes strength, longevity, and perseverance. And now the quiet and gentle animal has its own day on the calendar: May 23, which is this Sunday.
World Turtle Day was started a decade ago by American Tortoise Rescue, a nonprofit that works to protect all tortoise and turtle species. The yearly tradition celebrates turtles and encouraging people to learn more about how to protect the ancient reptiles.

To celebrate the day, why not spend May 23 outdoors, check out a few library books about turtles, or send a free turtle-themed e-card? There’s even a fun online quiz that can reveal your famous turtle alter-ego. However, our friends at the Humane Society hope that you remember turtle and tortoise species every day; they provide 12 ways to help protect these graceful creatures throughout the year."
--Sarah A. Henderson  From:


"The little glassy–eyed creatures may look cute and harmless, but small turtles can make people very ill. Turtles commonly carry bacteria called Salmonella on their outer skin and shell surfaces. People can get Salmonella by coming in contact with turtles or their habitats."  More at:

However, our friends at the Humane Society hope that you remember turtle and tortoise species every day.

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